SRIMATHI RADHA RANI.. AND HER LOVER

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With Caresses!
Love, one of the most powerful of human emotions, can motivate us to seek heights of spiritual ecstasy and perform acts of selflessness and compassion.

The relationship of Radha and Krishna is the embodiment of love, passion and devotion. Radha’s passion for Krishna symbolizes the soul’s intense longing and willingness for the ultimate unification with God. Shri Krishna is the soul of Radha and Radha is definitely the soul of Shri Krishna. She is the undivided form of Shri Krishna. She will remain a mystery unless one can know her inexpressible divine elements. She is worshipper as well as his deity to be worshipped. She being a beloved of Shri Krishna is known as “Radhika”.

Shri Krishna is not only the ultimate object of all love, but also is the topmost enjoyer of all loving relationships. Therefore, in the dynamic and expanding form of Krishna, He has unlimited desires to enjoy spiritual loving relationships or pastimes,known as leela. To do this, He expands Himself into the dual form of Krishna and Radha, His eternal consort and topmost devotee. In other words, Radha is the feminine aspect of Lord Krishna and is non-different from Krishna, but together (both the masculine and feminine aspects); they fulfill the purpose of engaging in sublime loving pastimes to exhibit supremely transcendental loving exchanges.
(From the Vaishnava point of view the divine feminine energy (shakti) implies a divine source of energy, God or shaktiman. “Sita relates to Rama; Lakshmi belongs to Narayana; Radha has Her Krishna.” As Krishna is believed to be the source of all manifestations of God, “Shri Radha, His consort, is the original source of all shaktis” or feminine manifestation of divine energy.)

The lotus-eyed, dark skinned Krishna is the complete and perfect man of Indian mythological traditions. That makes Krishna a major non-Aryan God in the Hindu pantheon. He was the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, the Preserver of Universe. He took the human form to redeem mankind from evil forces. Krishna was physically irresistibly appealing. Ancient texts dwell at length on his exceptionally alluring countenance: a blue complexion soft like the monsoon cloud, shining locks of black hair framing a beautifully chiselled face, large lotus like eyes, wild -flower garlands around his neck, a yellow garment (pitambara) draped around his body, a crown of peacock feathers on his head, and a smile playing on his lips, it is in this manner that he is faithfully represented since the ancient times to the modern.

Radha is recognized as the loveliest of all the cowgirls. She was the wife of Ayana and the daughter of the cowherd Vrishabhanu and his wife, Kamalavati. Radha was the mistress of Krishna during that period of his life when he lived among the cowherds of Vrindavan. Since childhood they were close to each other – they played, they danced, they fought, they grew up together and wanted to be together forever, but the world pulled them apart.
He departed to safeguard the virtues of truth, and she waited for Him. He vanquished His enemies, became the king, and came to be worshipped as a Lord of the universe. She waited for Him. He married Rukmini and Satyabhama, raised a family, fought the great war of Kurukshetra, and she still waited for Him.

Krishna and Radha
Look at a Parrot Couple (A Balanced Composition)
Krishna enjoyed the dance of love (rasa-lila) with the gopis many of whom are expansions of His own internal energies. The supreme gopi known as Srimati Radharani is the object of Krishna’s highest devotion. This beautiful dance would occur in the autumn season at night under a full moon when Lord Krishna would captivate the young gopis with the extraordinary music of His flute. These esoteric pastimes constitute the most confidential expression of divinity ever revealed

So great was Radha’s love for Krishna that even today her name is uttered whenever Krishna is referred to, and Krishna worship is thought to be incomplete without the deification of Radha. Radha’s utterly rapturous love for Krishna and their relationship is often interpreted as the quest for union with the divine. This kind of love is of the highest form of devotion, and is symbolically represented as the bond between the wife and husband or beloved and lover.
The intimate and playful themes that run through Krishna’s love for Radha and the festival nature of his dalliance with the gopis portray a vision of the divine that is approachable, warm, irresistible, blissful, and intoxicating. Krishna moves in a realm of love and lovemaking that invites (indeed demands) a total, impassioned response. All those who enter this realm are freed from bondage to the ordinary and customary, freed to behave imaginatively and spontaneously. The erotic aspect of this other world is not degrading but life-affirming. Erotic dalliance shuns the world of taboos and lived for the moment. It is an ovation to all that is vigorous and full of joy.

The young god Krishna is an unrepentant reveller stirring all those who join with him to uncontrollable frenzy. In the world of the great lover Krishna, the gopis, as representatives of the human, expand themselves; they plumb depths and reach heights of emotion that are impossible within the humdrum world of habitual action. They leave behind the ordinary and participate in the extraordinary. Under the influence of the intoxicating and intoxicated god they lose their inhibitions and revel in playful freedom.

Radha is the soul; Krishna is the God. Krishna is the shaktiman – possessor of energy – and Radha is His shakti – energy. She is the female counterpart of the Godhead. She is the personification of the highest love of God, and by her mercy the soul is connected with the service and love of Krishna.

Radha is married or involved with someone else, and still cannot resist Krishna’s musical call. In being with Him she risks social censure, alienation and humiliation. Riddled with shame and inappropriateness, this is hardly a relationship that purportedly embodies the highest union of pure love. Music becomes the voice of their illicit love which is too passionate, and secretive. Krishna is the cosmic musician who woos the gopi’s (cowherd girls) with his tunes.

Krishna’s flute sounds so powerful that they embodied the energy of the cosmos. His beauty, charm and musical skill impassion women everywhere; at the sound of his flute playing, the gopis “jump up in the middle of putting on her makeup, abandon her family while eating a meal, leave food to burn on the fire, and run out of her home to be with Krishna”. In the embrace of Krishna, the gopis, maddened with desire, found refuge; in their love dalliance with him who was the master in all the sixty-four arts of love, the gopis felt a thrill indescribable; and in making love with him in that climatic moment of release, in that one binding moment, they felt that joy and fulfilment which could not but be an aspect of the divine.

Radha Krishna
Through her experience, thus, the erotic the carnal and the profane became but an aspect of the sublime, the spiritual and the divine. This cumulative myth sustained one basic point: for women, Krishna was a personal god, always accessible and unfailingly responsive. He was a god specially made for women. In the popular psyche, Krishna and Radha became the universal symbol for the lover and the beloved. Krishna was the ideal hero and Radha the ideal heroine.

Real love exists between Radha and Krishna. Real love is transcendental and spiritual. We have to become attracted to spiritual love and give up false love and beauty, which are only skin-deep.

(Radha Krishna (IAST rādhā-kṛṣṇa, Sanskrit राधा कृष्ण) are collectively known within Hinduism as the combination of both the feminine as well as the masculine aspects of God. Krishna is often referred as svayam bhagavan in Vaishnavism theology and Radha is five elemental body of the feeling of love towards the almighty God Shree Krishna, soul (aatma) is a part of the God Shree Krishna and Radha is that feeling of love which connects a living being to his creator. With Krishna, Radha is acknowledged as the Supreme Goddess, for it is said that she controls Krishna.
It is believed that Krishna enchants the world, but Radha “enchants even Him. Therefore She is the supreme goddess of all. Radha Krishna”.  )

While there are much earlier references to the worship of this form of God, it is since Jayadeva Goswami wrote a famous poem Gita Govinda in the twelfth century of the Common Era, that the topic of the spiritual love between the divine Krishna and his devotee Radha, became a theme celebrated throughout India] It is also believed that Radha is not just one cowherd maiden, but is the origin of all the gopis, or divine personalities that participate in the rasa dance)…..Rani

 

raadha

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